Monday, February 24, 2014

Cambridge E-Luminate Festival


Cambridge's first E-luminate festival saw buildings across the city lit up using lo-carbon technology. I braved heavy winds on the opening night to photograph illuminations on Kings College, the Senate House and Guildhall. That was after the opening ceremony during which illusionist Alexis Arts made an amazing prediction. During the festival he also made a successful Guinness World Records attempt for the largest card reveal.

Alexis Arts at The Grand Arcade


Os and Xs on the Guildhall



There were concerts and workshops throughout the two weeks including twilight opening of many of the city's museums. I visited the Botanic Gardens Glass Houses and St Peter's Church.




The Botanic Gardens


St Peter's Church

I was pleased to be shortlisted in the festival photography competition for this photo of the Senate House Railings which got me into the closing ceremony at the Hilton.

The festival is set to become an annual event and beneath the artwork and entertainment the project is doing serious work in promoting low carbon lighting. The technology that has illuminated the city could one day illuminate our homes and work places providing the light we need without it costing the Earth.

Look out for details of the festival in future years. It is sure to be yet another attraction in this world famous city. Here are a couple of the animated projections from the festival:

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Brighton Museum and Art Gallery: Spectators and Performers Exhibition

Fat Boy Slim’s slipmats sit next to a hurdy-gurdy and a laughing cloud greets you at the entrance to this upstairs room of the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery.

It is home to props and costumes from celebrations around the world like Bamana in Mali where bright puppets dance and battle through the night. The long-necked yellow goat on display looks like it’s about to pick a fight with the figure dressed in a gold swordfish helmet brandishing a pair of swords from the Niger Delta, home of the Kalibari Tribe.
Elsewhere a sequin-clad monkey marionette from Burma leaps through the air wielding a club and the costume of a mysterious Nigerian Egungun dancer draws much curiosity. Videos show some exhibits in action like the graceful Vietnamese water puppets.

Concise information labels tell stories like how eight year-old African boys encounter the terrifying masked Bedu dancers before joining their ritual celebration.

There is a lack of interactive features here when museums are full of buttons, touchable exhibits and computers. The fully functional Punch and Judy theatre is a superb attraction, but a bit big for young puppeteers to operate comfortably.

Not that anyone will be bored, the exhibition can be viewed in minutes but captivates the imagination for far longer. From the enormous shadow puppets that act out Indian folk tales to the jewel encrusted Burmese dancer’s suit, this is the costume department from that grandest of theatre productions: life!


Spectators and Performers
1st Floor, Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, Royal Pavilion Gardens
Open: Tuesday-Sunday 10am-5pm

Admission Free

Saturday, September 14, 2013

A VIP Tour of Brighton Dome



Sitting in the modern auditorium at the Brighton Dome it's hard to imagine the place was once a courtyard with a fountain and stables. Neither can you visualise the rows of hospital beds that held wounded Indian soldiers in the Second World War.

The 200 year history of this unique venue built by the Prince of Wales (later George IV) to house his horses in 1803 goes un-noted by most of the visitors who attend the regular shows, concerts and conferences that are held there these days.

On this free tour offered as part of Heritage Open Days we learnt about the fascinating history of the building and explored all it's nooks and crannies.

In the centre of the stage stood the vintage electric organ that organist Douglas Reeve entertained audiences on during the Second World War and for many years after, earning a place in the Guinness Book of Records for longest running seaside show. 

Current organist John Mann gave a demonstration. A warm crackle filled the air then he ran his fingers over the keys bringing forth sounds of xylophones, sleigh bells and birdsong.

Time was short and we continued to the Corn Exchange which was in a bit of disarray between shows but has all the lavish grandeur the prince was famous for. The huge beams are made from single pieces of wood and when the stage is set it's a premier concert venue.

The tour then extended beyond the public rooms to the underground backstage area. It's a warren of passages which could easily lead to Spinal Tap scenarios of artists getting lost on their way to the stage.

It's possibly the only venue to feature a secret tunnel, which was built by The Prince of Wales so he could pass unseen between the Dome and the Corn Exchange. It's a facility that some of the more reclusive performers might make use of if it wasn't so dank and smelly.

Our guide had worked at the Dome for 13 years and had plenty of stories about famous names who have played there including Beyonce who thought she was in London and wanted her dressing room painted pink (the request was refused) and Lemmy from Motorhead who used a shower cap to disable the smoke alarm in his dressing room.

It was these details and anecdotes that made the venue itself the star of this special show.

Paid tours of Brighton Dome are available at other times and private tours can be arranged. See the website for details.

Friday, September 6, 2013

Cycling to St Ives (Cambridgeshire)

I visited St Ives earlier this summer. I don't know why I didn't go earlier. What was I thinking? The colourful market spilling along the main street, the fine medieval buildings and bridge over a picturesque stretch of river make it a perfect escape from the relative metropolis of Cambridge. I went to the St Ives in Cornwall when I was 3 so there's no excuse.

In fact getting to St Ives from Cambridge has got a whole lot easier since the opening of the guided bus. From Cambridge Regional College on Kings Hedges Road the bus cuts a path across glorious countryside making it a swift pleasurable journey. An even greener, more invigorating option is the broad, smooth cycleway that runs alongside the bus track.

It's a pleasure to ride along and sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species.



The going can get tough if the wind is against you but on a fine day there is no safer or easier cycle route and the journey is as enjoyable as the destination. Once you get to the guided bus stop on King's Hedges Road you can't get lost. Head straight along the path which can also be incorporated into many other routes of varying lengths taking in the villages in between.

For more cycle rides in Cambridge read my article on Local Secrets.
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf
Sights on the route include the windmill at Over, and Fen Drayton Nature Reserve with incredible views of lakes formed from disused sand and gravel pits, now home to 190 bird species. - See more at: http://www.localsecrets.com/ezine.cfm?ezineid=3569~on+your+bike+sports+and+outdoor#sthash.kyLLRooK.dpuf

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

In Pictures: A Day in Morroco

From Tarifa in Spain Morocco is one hour away by ferry making port town Tangier an easy day trip. I went on a one day tour with FRS Ferries and whilst I needed to stay longer to fully experience the country the tour fit a lot in giving a wonderful taste of this incredible country. You can read a full account of my visit here.

First time on a camel.

Lush countryside surrounding Tangier

Weekend market






Covered Souk (market)
Grand Socco
Moroccan tea and pastries for dessert
A carpet emporium. I returned with a small rug and selection of pottery after some intense bartering.
A pharmacy with shelf fulls of mysterious ingredients.







The medina
Looking out to the port
More photos:

Friday, August 23, 2013

Things to Love About Brighton


I'm moving to Brighton in September a place I only visited for the first time earlier this year. The general reaction when I tell people this is, "You'll love it!" I spent a couple of days as a tourist in my future hometown and found there is indeed much to love about it.

Volk's Electric Railway

The world's oldest electric train has been taking holiday makers up and down the seafront since 1883. Even sharing a small compartment with a mother and noisy child, two overweight tourists a dog can't spoil the pleasure of the fifteen ride between the pier and the marina.


Brighton Pier

I didn't think I'd have much time for the kitsch attractions loaded onto the most prominent landmark on the seafront. But the combination of the sea beneath your feet, seagulls swooping overhead, pop songs and the screams of thrill seekers at the funfair, the smell of fish and chips and candy floss is strangely uplifting especially on a sunny day.

About 100 yards down the coast the skeletal remains of the West Pier rise above the waves. The 19th century attraction was closed on 1975 and burnt down in 2003 leaving a ghostly relic of a bygone era.

Pavilion Park

In addition to miles of beaches the city is full of green spaces. The Pavilion Park is a calm oasis right in the heart of the city with well-kept lawns and flowerbeds and buskers adding to the chilled out vibe.
It is also home to the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery. It features exhibitions covering Brighton's history, modern art and temporary exhibitions. There is also an Egyptian section celebrating the work of early Egyptologists from the area.
The museum is open from Tuesday-Saturday and admission is free. It's also the only place I could find to store luggage in the centre of Brighton. Coin operated lockers are on the ground floor.

Snoopers Paradise

If Ebay was a shop it might look something like Snoopers Paradise in Kensington Gardens and it's a lot more fun to browse. The sprawling store contains hundreds of glass cabinets containing computer games, wristwatches, vintage cameras, musical instruments and anything else you can imagine. Items are arranged separately in neat displays or thrown together in random combinations. Racks of clothing and overflowing bookshelves add to the labyrinth of wares whilst the first floor is full of vintage clothing and other nicknacks.

Northern Lights

I barely scratched the surface of Brighton's varied nightlife but this Nordic themed bar tucked away on Little East Street is a popular local hangout serving Scandanavian food and beer.

www.northernlightsbrighton.co.uk

Caroline Lucas

Source: The Health Hotel
Liberal and forward-thinking Brighton elected Caroline Lucas as Britain's first Green MP in 2010. She is a devoted politician and activist on green and social issues. During my visit she was arrested at an anti-fracking demonstration.
Brighton should be proud to have an MP who's prepared to fight issues on the front line.

www.carolinelucas.com

Devil's Dyke

The open-top 77 bus goes to this pristine area of countryside in the downs. Take in the hilltop views before descending down the dyke and explore the varied landscape of meadows and woodland.

It's worth taking a good map. There is a leaflet with information and suggested routes but they are not clearly marked. After taking a few wrong turns I returned the way I had come. It's also worth taking a picnic on a nice day. There is the Devil's Dyke pub next to the bus stop but there are no shops nearby.

What else is there to love about Brighton? Let me know and I'll add any new favourites to this post.

Saturday, August 3, 2013

How to claim compensation for delayed rail services

I recently took a train from Cambridge to Kings Cross London. It was all right until Potters Bar where there was a long wait. The train then crawled to the next station where there was a further wait. It then pulled out of the station, reversed onto another platform and waited again before trundling into the capital.

It's an unofficial regulation that all British trains have to carry a pompous old man. The one next to me placed an angry call to customer services concluding "You're an extremely annoying man. I'm terminating this call." He later complained loudly that it was no wonder the country was falling to pieces as previous generations of his family have no doubt done since Stephenson's Rocket was delayed by the wrong kind of snow.

When we arrived at Kings Cross I noted that the delay was over 30 minutes meaning I could claim compensation. First Capital Connect provide a simple form for this on their website.

I got a reply within a couple of days rejecting my claim because the delay had been under 30 minutes. I replied:

Thank you for your reply. I took the 9:28 from Cambridge and it did not arrive at Kings Cross until after 11:00 (It was due at 10:28). Please review my claim.

A couple of days later I got another reply. It confirmed that my train had left Cambridge at 9:27 and arrived at 11:11. In a shameless attempt at PR spin it went on to say: "I am pleased to issue a £5.50 Rail Travel Voucher as a one off gesture of goodwill."

Thank you First Capital Connect for generously issuing the compensation I was entitled to. I look forward to travelling with you again. Hopefully you'll have the "goodwill" to run the service on time.